Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development (JRRD)

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Electromyogram pattern recognition for control of powered upper-limb prostheses: State of the art and challenges for clinical use

Erik Scheme, MSc, PEng; Kevin Englehart, PhD, PEng


Figure 1. Targeted muscle reinnervation in person with shoulder disarticulation. EMG = electromyogram, N. = nerve. Source: Reproduced with permission of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago.

The expectations for artificial upper-limbs have always been high because of their portrayal in popular media and comparisons with nondisabled dexterity. In the United States, approximately 30,000 persons have an above-elbow amputation and 60,000 have a below-elbow amputation. Only a small percentage of patients with an upper-limb amputation regularly use a prosthesis, mainly because of a perceived lack of function. This article describes the use of pattern recognition to enhance the dexterity of upper-limb prostheses and the current challenges in transferring this dexterity to commercial devices.

Volume 48 Number 6, 2011
   Pages 643 — 660


View HTML  ¦  View PDF  ¦  Contents Vol. 48, No. 6
This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows:
Scheme E, Englehart K. Electromyogram pattern recognition for control of powered upper-limb prostheses: State of the art and challenges for clinical use. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2011;48(6):643-60.
DOI:10.1682/JRRD.2010.09.0177
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Last Reviewed or Updated  Monday, July 11, 2011 9:17 AM

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