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Volume 42, Number 1, January/February 2005
Pages 115 — 124


Abstract - Quality of life in male tracheoesophageal (TE) speakers

Tanya L. Eadie, PhD;1* Philip C. Doyle, PhD2

1Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Voice Production and Perception Laboratory, Doctoral Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
Abstract — For this study, we determined the quality of life (QOL) in individuals who had undergone total laryngectomy (TL) and who used tracheoesophageal (TE) speech as their primary method of postlaryngectomy communication. We also descriptively compared present QOL outcomes with those found in an extension of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) Laryngeal Cancer Study. Thirty laryngectomized men with TE speech as their primary mode of communication were recruited for participation in the investigation. Participants completed a general information form as well as the University of Michigan Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL) instrument. Results revealed a high level of self-perceived QOL in the domains of communication, eating, pain, and emotion that was empirically better than results found in a previous study involving individuals who had undergone TL and who were treated in VA hospitals. Possible reasons for the improved self-reported QOL among individuals in the present group include use of TE speech for postlaryngectomy communication, a higher level of education, and membership in a support group. The results suggest to us that these factors should be considered in postlaryngectomy care in the veteran population to optimize rehabilitation outcomes.
Key words: HNQOL instrument, laryngeal cancer, quality of life scales, rehabilitation, surgical-prosthetic voice restoration, tracheoesophageal speech, veterans.

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  Last Reviewed or Updated Tuesday, June 28, 2005 10:58 AM