Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development (JRRD)

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Volume 48 Number 7, 2011
   Pages 755 — 762

Abstract —  Factors related to rapidity of housing placement in Housing and Urban Development-Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing program of 1990s

Jack Tsai, PhD;1-2* Maria O'Connell, PhD;2-3 Wesley J. Kasprow, PhD, MPH;4 Robert A. Rosenheck, MD1-2,5

1Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, and Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; 2VA National Center on Homelessness Among Veterans, West Haven, CT; 3Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health, New Haven, CT; 4VA Northeast Program Evaluation Center, West Haven, CT; 5Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, and VA New England Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, West Haven, CT

Abstract — The Housing and Urban Development-Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program is the largest supported housing program in the country for homeless veterans who are seeking rapid entry into permanent independent housing. This study examined factors related to how rapidly clients were housed in the early years of the program and how long they stayed in the program. Mental health, substance abuse, work/income, criminal history, and site were examined as predictors of process times. Regression analyses based on 627 HUD-VASH clients who entered the program between 1992 and 2003 showed that client characteristics were not rate-limiting factors for obtaining HUD-VASH housing; i.e., clients who had greater substance abuse problems or more extensive criminal histories did not take longer to obtain housing. The large differences associated with site of entry partly reflected a curvilinear relationship between the duration of operation of the HUD-VASH program and process times; i.e., at relatively younger and older programs, clients entered housing slightly faster than at programs in the middle range. Lastly, HUD-VASH clients whose case managers reported good therapeutic alliances stayed in the program longer. These findings have implications for the continued expansion of the HUD-VASH program.

Key words: criminal history, homelessness, program development, program operation, severe mental illness, substance abuse, supported housing, therapeutic alliance, VA, veterans.


View HTML  ¦  View PDF  ¦  Contents Vol. 48, No. 7
This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows:
Tsai J, O'Connell M, Kasprow WJ, Rosenheck RA. Factors related to rapidity of housing placement in Housing and Urban Development-Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing program of 1990s. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2011;48(7):755-62.
DOI:10.1682/JRRD.2010.09.0178
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