Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development (JRRD)

Quick Links

  • Health Programs
  • Protect your health
  • Learn more: A-Z Health
Veterans Crisis Line Badge
 

JRRD at a Glance


Physical activity and transcutaneous oxygen pressure in men with spinal cord injury

Beatriz Crespo-Ruiz, MSc, et al.

Figure 2. Handmade polyethylene foam pads to decrease high-pressure area development.

Spinal cord injury (SCI) involves a number of changes at the metabolic and physiological levels. Several studies have shown that pressure at the interface between the user and the seating surface is the main factor involved in the emergence of pressure ulcers (PUs). This pressure leads to less or even no peripheral arterial blood circulation. Physical activity improves the quality of life and physiological responses of people in SCI. Therefore, regular physical activity could improve the physiological parameters involved in readaptating blood flow overall and in the ischial area (lower buttocks), specifically, which is at higher risk for PUs.

Volume 49 Number 6, 2012
   Pages 913 — 924


View HTML  ¦  View PDF  ¦  Contents Vol. 49, No. 6
This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows:
Crespo-Ruiz B, del-Ama AJ, Jiménez-Díaz FJ, Morgan J,
de la Peña-González A, Gil-Agudo ÁM. Physical activity and transcutaneous oxygen pressure in men with spinal cord injury. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2012;49(6):913–24.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1682/JRRD.2011.05.0087
iThenticateCrossref

Go to TOP

Last Reviewed or Updated  Thursday, August 16, 2012 11:20 AM

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional